Friday, 6 March 2015

Scam Postcards

ACTION FRAUD: This is a message sent via Thames Valley Alert and has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

Scam postcards are being delivered to UK residents’ homes claiming that a parcel containing “jewellery” is waiting for the home-owner.

The personally addressed postcards say:
“The office is attempting to reach you. To claim this parcel and accept this offer, you must telephone the number below immediately and arrange for a delivery. The item is prepaid, but a processing and delivery free of £10 must be remitted. This fee can be paid only by telephone and only with a credit card (VISA or MasterCard). This is your only notification”
 If you call the 020 number you are asked to pay £10 by credit card. Victims who have reported this to Action Fraud have said that the automated service told them the package would be delivered the same day, but did not receive anything.

Action Fraud has received several reports of this recently occurring fraud and this information has been assessed by National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) resulting in disruption of the fraudster's phone number.

Also be on the lookout for slight variations of this scam - which use different phone numbers and delivery items.

Protection and reporting advice if you receive one these postcards:
  • Do not call the number provided.
  • Do not give your card details.
  • If you receive a delivery card through your letterbox which you do not believe is genuine and which asks you to dial a premium rate number, you can contact PhonepayPlus on 0800 500 212 (Mon-Fri, 8am-6pm) for further guidance.
 If you receive one of these delivery cards, do not pay any money and report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or by using the online reporting tool.

Fraud of the Rings

This is a message sent via Thames Valley Alert and has been sent on behalf of Action Fraud.

Please look out for a fraud which is being reported around the South-East of England at the moment.

Whilst driving, the victim is flagged down by a man (or men) next to a broken down vehicle. The man states that he needs money to get petrol. As payment, the man offers the victim one to three “gold” rings and may also provide a business card suggesting links to Berlin, Germany or Glasgow, Scotland.

The amount of cash taken is between £20 and £300. However, the rings are worthless and definitely not precious. Offences are occurring on ‘A’ roads and slip roads at major junctions in the South of England. One victim reports seeing the same offender(s) back at the same spot (the A41 bypass near Tring, on this occasion) two days later at approximately 12:50pm.

All suspects are described as male and with dark hair. The description of the “broken down” vehicle varies. Offenders seem to target men over the age of 55.

Prevention advice: • Do not accept jewellery as payment!